The Ultimate Guide on How to Increase the TRL of Your New Product: Tips and Tricks

Learning Centre > The Ultimate Guide on How to Increase the TRL of Your New Product: Tips and Tricks

In this guide, we will discuss some tips and tricks on how to increase the TRL of your new product. Follow these guidelines and you'll be well on your way to success!

In this guide, we will discuss some tips and tricks on how to increase the TRL of your new product. Follow these guidelines and you'll be well on your way to success!In this guide, we will discuss some tips and tricks on how to increase the TRL of your new product. Follow these guidelines and you'll be well on your way to success!
Contents

If you’re reading this, chances are you’re looking for ways to increase the TRL of your new product. TRL, or readiness level, is a critical factor in determining the success of a product. Therefore, it’s important to have a high TRL before releasing your product to the market, ensuring that it successfully meets customer needs.

In this guide, we will discuss some tips and tricks on how to increase the TRL of your new product. Follow these guidelines, and you’ll be well to success!

Please note that we will refer to physical products instead of digital ones.


What is a TRL (Technology Readiness Level)?

A TRL measures how far along a technology is in its development cycle. It is typically used by businesses and governments to determine whether a particular technology is ready for commercialisation or if further research and development are needed. The TRL scale goes from 1 to 9, with one the least ready and nine the readiest.

A technology that is at TRL 1 has just been conceived and may only exist in a laboratory setting. On the other hand, a technology at TRL 9 has been proven to work in its intended environment and is ready for widespread commercialisation. There are various prototype testing, field testing, and operational feasibility testing between these two extremes.

The TRL scale provides a useful framework for businesses and governments to assess technology readiness and decide whether to invest in further development or commercialisation.


What might happen if my product’s TRL is low?

The technology readiness level (TRL) measures how advanced technology is. Technologies with a low TRL are less mature and less reliable. At the same time, those with a high TRL are more mature and more reliable. If your technology has a low TRL, it is not yet ready for widespread use; this could result in reduced performance, lower quality, or even safety concerns.

As technology advances, the TRL will increase, indicating that it is becoming more ready for widespread use. Therefore, if your technology has a low TRL, it is important to keep up with the latest advancements to improve reliability and performance.


How can I calculate the TRL of my new product?

There are a few different ways to calculate the TRL of your new product. One method is to use the Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) tool, available for download from Innovolo.


Who might be interested in my TRL?

There are a few different groups of people who might be interested in your TRL. These include potential investors, customers, and partners.


When should I start worrying about the TRL of my new product? 

Assessing technology readiness levels is important during any new technology development process. The purpose of TRLs is to track the progress of technology from its conceptual phase through its eventual integration into a larger system of mature technology.

Generally speaking, you should start worrying about the TRL rating of your new product when it reaches level 5. At this point, you should sufficiently develop the technology to demonstrate basic functionality in a realistic environment. If your technology is not yet at level 5, significant technical risks still need to be addressed. Once your technology reaches level 5, you can begin to focus on commercialisation and moving your product into the marketplace.

An advance to the technology readiness level is not trivial or automatic. The most mature technology is only advanced through systematic and careful technology development and testing program. This process can be time-consuming and expensive, so it is important to ensure that you have the resources to support it.

Detailed guidance on how to increase the TRL of your new product is outside the scope of this article, but there are a few general tips that may be useful:


When might TRL be less important?

There are a few situations when the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) may not be as important. These include if you are not planning to commercialise your technology, are not seeking investment or funding for your technology, or are not looking for partners or customers for your technology. In these cases, TRL can still be a useful tool for assessing technology readiness, but it may not be as important. For example, suppose you are not planning to commercialise your technology. In that case, you may not need to worry about achieving a high TRL. However, a higher TRL may be more important if you seek investment or funding for your technology. Similarly, a higher TRL may be more important if you are looking for partners or customers for your technology.

It is important to carry out future research to increase TRL if you want to commercialise your technology or take it to the next stage; this is because TRL measures the maturity of your technology and can help you identify areas where further research is required. It can also assess the risk involved in investing in your technology.


Are there any benefits to having a high TRL?

Yes, there are a few benefits to having a high TRL. These include increased reliability, improved performance, and reduced risks.

Technology with a high TRL is more reliable than one with a low TRL because technology with a high TRL has undergone more testing and development and is, therefore, less likely to experience problems.

Technology with a high TRL is also likely to perform better than one with a low TRL because the more developed technology is typically more refined and efficient.

Finally, technology with a high TRL is associated with reduced risks; this is because the more developed technology has a lower risk of failure and is less likely to experience unforeseen problems.


Why might TRL matter more for some products than others?

There are a few reasons why the maturity level might matter more for some products than others. These include the complexity, the stage of development, and the product’s intended use.

Having detailed guidance on TRLs backed by scientific research can be helpful when trying to assess the readiness of your technology. However, TRL is only one tool that should be used when assessing the readiness of your technology. Other factors, such as the complexity and the stage of development of your product, may also be important to consider.


How might TRL change over time?

As projects progress, the technology level will likely increase; this is because, as projects move from the conceptual phase to the development phase to the implementation phase, the technology becomes more developed and refined.

Organisations need to assess during the development process of any new technology. By using TRL as a starting point, you can identify what work still needs to be done to increase the TRL of your product; this will ensure that your product is ready for commercialisation when it reaches the marketplace.


Who would be responsible for tracking the technical maturity of my product during development?

As the person responsible for overseeing a product’s development, it falls to the project manager to track the technical maturity of the product; this involves assessing the current state of the product and its readiness for release and keeping an eye on future trends that could impact its performance. By tracking the technical maturity, the project manager can ensure that it meets the necessary standards for release and remains competitive in the marketplace.

Additionally, you can use this information to identify areas where further development is needed, either to improve the product’s performance or to address future trends. Finally, by tracking the technical maturity, the project manager can ensure that it meets the highest standards and remains at the forefront of its field.


What can I do if TRL is out of my control?

Technology readiness levels do not always progress linearly, no matter how much we want them to. Sometimes, the technology gets “stuck” at a certain TRL due to constraints beyond our control. In these cases, it is important to remember that TRL is only one metric of success and that other factors contribute to the success of a technology.

For example, even if a technology project is “stuck” at TRL 4, it may still be successful if it has strong market potential or can solve an important problem. In other words, don’t get too discouraged if your technology’s TRL isn’t progressing as you’d like. There are many other ways to measure success, and your technology may still be successful even if it doesn’t have a high TRL.


What are the basic principles of TRLs?

Level 1

Basic principles observed and reported: Level 1 technology readiness is the lowest technology readiness level. At this level, scientific research begins to be translated into applied research and development. An example of technology at Level 1 readiness is a paper study of a technology’s basic properties. Paper studies are important because they help scientists to understand the technology’s potential applications and limitations. However, they are also very limited in scope and cannot be used to develop working prototypes or products. As such, technologies at Level 1 readiness are typically not ready for commercialisation or large-scale production.

Level 2

Technology concept and/or application formulated. Level 2 technology readiness means that the technology concept and/or application has been formulated. This level marks the beginning of invention, where basic principles are observed, and you can invent practical applications. However, these applications are speculative, and there may be no proof or detailed analysis to support the assumptions. Examples are limited to analytic studies. This technology readiness level is important because it provides a foundation for further development. Without a basic understanding of the technology, it would be difficult to move on to more complex applications. However, Level 2 technology readiness is just the first step in a long journey toward practical implementation.

Level 3

Analytical and experimental critical function and/or characteristic proof of concept. Level 3 is all about proof of concept; this is where analytical and experimental studies are undertaken to validate the predictions made about separate elements of the technology. These studies take place in a laboratory setting, and they help show that the technology is feasible and effective. Active research and development are also initiated to improve the technology further. Ultimately, Level 3 demonstrates that the technology is ready for real-world applications.

Level 4

Component and/or breadboard validation in a laboratory environment. Level 4 on the TRL scale indicates that technology has been successfully tested in a laboratory environment; basic technological components have been integrated and shown to work together. While this is a lower level of fidelity than the eventual system, it is still an important step in the development process. Success at this stage helps ensure that technology will be ready for use in an operational setting.

Level 5

Component and/or breadboard validation in a relevant environment. A technology reaches Level 5 when the basic technological components are integrated with reasonably realistic supporting elements so they can be tested in a simulated environment; this allows for a more accurate prediction of technology performance in an operational environment. Reaching Level 5 is a significant milestone. The technology is much closer to being deployed in an operational setting; this can help increase confidence in the technology and pave the way for future success.

Level 6

System/subsystem model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment. A technology at TRL 6 has been tested in a relevant environment and is a major step up from TRL 5; it is much closer to being ready for real-world use. To reach TRL 6, technology must go through rigorous tests to ensure that it is safe and effective; this can be a lengthy and expensive process, but it is essential to ensure that the technology is ready for market. Once technology reaches TRL 6, it is typically ready for commercialisation and mass production.

Level 7

System prototype demonstration in an operational environment. TRL 7 prototype demonstrations typically occur in an operational environment such as an aircraft, vehicle, or space; this represents a major technology readiness step up from TRL 6. In addition, it requires the demonstration of an actual system prototype. In many cases, the prototype at TRL 7 is near or at the planned operational system; this gives engineers and developers a chance to see how the technology performs in a realistic setting and make any necessary modifications before deploying it on a large scale. Such demonstrations are vital for ensuring that new technologies are ready for use in real-world situations.

Level 8

The actual system was completed and qualified through test and demonstration. Level 8 on the TRL scale means that the technology has been proven to work in its final form and under expected conditions; it is ready for use in a real-world scenario, such as in a weapon system. To reach Level 8, the technology must undergo extensive testing to meet all design specifications. Once it has been shown to work effectively under various conditions, it can be considered ready for practical use. Level 8 is usually the highest TRL that can be achieved, representing the end of true system development.

Level 9

The actual system has been proven through successful mission operations. TRL Level nine is the highest TRL on the scale and means that technology has been proven to work in an operational setting; it has completed all mission requirements and is now being used in its intended environment. To reach TRL nine, a technology must undergo extensive testing and evaluation to ensure that it can perform as intended. Once effective in an operational setting, it can be considered ready for widespread use. As a result, TRL 9 technologies are typically used on a large scale and significantly impact the world.


The use of Technology Readiness Levels by NASA

As an aerospace engineer knows, the successful development of new technologies is essential for advancing space exploration. However, developing new technologies is a complex and time-consuming process that often involves multiple iterations and testing phases. To help streamline this, NASA adopted TRLs in the early 1990s to more easily track the progress of new technologies. TRLs provide a clear and concise roadmap for technology development, from initial concept to widespread use; this makes it easier for engineers and developers to understand where a technology is in its lifecycle and what needs to be done to move it forward. TRLs are also a valuable tool for project managers. They can use TRLs to assess the risks and potential rewards of investing in new technologies.

When technology is at stage 1, scientific study has begun. Those findings are being converted into future research and development. When the fundamental concepts have been researched, and practical applications can be applied to those first findings, TRL 2 occurs. It is extremely speculative because there is no experimental proof of concept for the TRL 2 technology.

When technology development and evaluation begin, it is raised to TRL 3. At this level, analytical and lab research is usually required to determine if a technology is viable and ready to continue through the development process. A proof-of-concept model is frequently created during TRL 3.

The stage of TRL 4 is reached once the proof-of-concept technology has been implemented. During this level, many component components are put together and tested separately.

A breadboard technology has not yet achieved TRL 5. In contrast, a technology that has already reached TRL 5 is a breadboard technology and must be subjected to greater testing than one that has only reached TRL 4. In addition, simulations should be conducted in environments as close to real-life as possible.

When the testing of TRL 5 is completed, a technology may move on to TRL 6. For example, a technology with a complete prototype or representational model is at TRL 6.

The Level 7 technology requires a working model or prototype to be demonstrated in a space environment. TRL 8 technology has been tested and “flight-qualified,” and it’s ready for use in an existing technology or technology system. When a technical innovation has been “flight-proven” during a successful mission, it can be TRL 9.


The adoption of TRLs by the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) is the space agency of the European Union (EU). Its mission is to “shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.” ESA achieves this by supporting the development of new technologies through its TRL program. Similar to NASA’s TRL program, ESA’s TRL program is a way to track the progress of new technologies and assess their readiness for space exploration. However, there are some key differences between the two programs.

ESA’s TRL program is also more focused on commercialising new technologies; this is evident in that TRLs 7 to 12 deal with some form of technology demonstration in a real-world environment. For example, TRL 7 requires that technology be demonstrated in a relevant environment, TRL 8 requires that the technology be “flight-qualified,” and TRL 9 requires that the technology be “flight-proven.” This focus on commercialisation is in line with ESA’s mission to ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe.

TRLs are a valuable tool for anyone involved in developing new technologies, whether for space exploration or some other application. They provide a way to track the progress of technology and assess its readiness for use.


Brief History of TRLs


How to move from TRL 1 to TRL 2 in your product development project:

TRL1 is the initial level of technology readiness, while TRL2 is the next level of readiness. At TRL2, you have started to apply R&D to your basic scientific principles and identified your first applications. You may have also conducted experiments to test the suitability of those applications. However, you still need to evidence your progress; this can be done through 3rd party verified test data or published academic papers. Once you have at least one technology application that 3rd party data or published papers have verified, you will have reached TRL.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 1 to TRL 2 are:

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL2. These can include:


How to move from TRL 2 to TRL 3 in your product development project:

The first step in moving from TRL 2 to TRL 3 is identifying the key technical risks associated with the technology. These risks can be divided into two main categories: technical feasibility and commercial viability. For each category, several sub-risks must be considered and addressed. Once the key risks have been identified, a plan can be developed to mitigate them. This plan should include both short-term and long-term actions. In the short term, efforts should reduce the uncertainty associated with the technology. This can be done through additional experimentation or developing prototypes for specific applications.

In the long term, the goal should be to demonstrate commercial viability. This can be done by partnering with companies interested in using the technology or developing a product that can be sold to customers.

As your technology matures and you move closer to commercialisation, it is important to keep in mind the needs of your target market. This includes understanding their requirements, pain points, and what they are willing to pay for a solution. It is also important to consider the regulatory environment where your product will be used. This can have a major impact on the commercial viability of your technology.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 2 to TRL 3 are:

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL3. These can include:


‍How to move from TRL 3 to TRL 4 in your product development project:

To move from TRL 3 to TRL 4 in your product development project, you must demonstrate that your product or technology works as intended under real-world conditions; this involves demonstrating the feasibility and effectiveness of your product in a controlled environment. Once you have done this, you can scale up your production and commercialise your product. However, reaching TRL 4 is not always easy, and you may face challenges such as financing, regulations, and market acceptance. By understanding these challenges and taking steps to address them, you can increase your chances of success and reach your goal of commercialisation.

TRL4 means that you have completed the integration and testing of the technology into its first application. TRL3 means that you have conducted analysis or experiments to predict future performance and tested subsystems or components in the lab.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 3 to TRL 4 are:

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL4. These can include:

‍Make sure you are aware of these possible challenges and have contingencies in place so that they don’t hold up your project.


‍How to move from TRL 4 to TRL 5 in your product development project:

To move from TRL4 to TRL5 in your product development project, you need to demonstrate that the technology works in an acceptable way to your customers. This can be done through trials or other forms of customer feedback. Trials will help you gather data on how the technology performs in a real-world environment. At the same time, customer feedback will give you insight into whether or not the technology meets your target market’s needs. Once you have gathered this information, you can make necessary adjustments to your product before taking it to market. By taking the time to reach TRL5, you can ensure that your product is ready for success.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 4 to TRL 5 are:

To move from TRL 4 to TRL 5, you must demonstrate that the technology works in an acceptable way to your customers.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL5. These can include:

‍Addressing the challenges, you face along the way can be difficult. Still, it is important to remember that they are not insurmountable. By planning and allocating the necessary resources, you should be able to overcome any challenges that stand in your way.

How to move from TRL 5 to TRL 6 in your product development project:

There are a few key things to keep in mind when moving from TRL5 to TRL6 in your product development project. First, it is important to ensure that your technology is fully integrated. This means ensuring that all components are properly connected and that the system is functioning as intended. Next, you will need to produce a complete prototype of the system. This prototype should represent the final product and show that the system is viable and effective.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 5 to TRL 6 are:

To move from TRL 5 to TRL6, you must also be able to evidence the success of your trials. You could do this through customer feedback, data gathered from the trials themselves, or other reporting mechanisms.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL6. These can include:

Moving from TRL 5 to TRL 6 can be a daunting task, but it’s achievable with preparation and planning. By understanding the key steps involved and the challenges you may face along the way, you’ll be well to reach the final stage of product development.


How to move from TRL 6 to TRL 7 in your product development project:

TRL6 is when technology has proven viable and ready for product development. At the same time, TRL7 is the stage at which technology has been proven to be mature and ready for widespread deployment.

‍The key steps involved in moving from TRL 6 to TRL 7 are:

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL7. These can include:


How to move from TRL 7 to TRL 8 in your product development project:

TRL7 is the stage at which technology has been tested and proven to work in a prototype form. TRL8 is when technology has been shown to work in a commercial setting, with all the necessary durability and performance requirements.

‍The key steps involved in moving from TRL 7 to TRL 8 are:

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL8. These can include:


How to move from TRL 8 to TRL 9 in your product development project:

TRL8 is when technology has been proven to work and be durable in a commercial setting. Finally, TRL9 is the point at which technology is in production in commercial volumes.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 8 to TRL 9 are:

When moving from TRL 8 to TRL 9, it’s important to consider how your technology compares to others in terms of maturity. You may need to do additional work to bring your technology up to par with the best in the industry.

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL9. These can include:

How to move from TRL 9 to TRL 10 in your product development project:

TRL9 is the point where you have a commercial product in volume production. The product being manufactured verifies that the technology works and is reliable. TRL10 is the point where your technology has been replicated across several applications. You have extensive warranty data that confirm performance and durability meet targets in the real world.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 9 to TRL 10 are:

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL10. These can include:


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If you’re reading this, chances are you’re looking for ways to increase the TRL of your new product. TRL, or readiness level, is a critical factor in determining the success of a product. Therefore, it’s important to have a high TRL before releasing your product to the market, ensuring that it successfully meets customer needs.

In this guide, we will discuss some tips and tricks on how to increase the TRL of your new product. Follow these guidelines, and you’ll be well to success!

Please note that we will refer to physical products instead of digital ones.


What is a TRL (Technology Readiness Level)?

A TRL measures how far along a technology is in its development cycle. It is typically used by businesses and governments to determine whether a particular technology is ready for commercialisation or if further research and development are needed. The TRL scale goes from 1 to 9, with one the least ready and nine the readiest.

A technology that is at TRL 1 has just been conceived and may only exist in a laboratory setting. On the other hand, a technology at TRL 9 has been proven to work in its intended environment and is ready for widespread commercialisation. There are various prototype testing, field testing, and operational feasibility testing between these two extremes.

The TRL scale provides a useful framework for businesses and governments to assess technology readiness and decide whether to invest in further development or commercialisation.


What might happen if my product’s TRL is low?

The technology readiness level (TRL) measures how advanced technology is. Technologies with a low TRL are less mature and less reliable. At the same time, those with a high TRL are more mature and more reliable. If your technology has a low TRL, it is not yet ready for widespread use; this could result in reduced performance, lower quality, or even safety concerns.

As technology advances, the TRL will increase, indicating that it is becoming more ready for widespread use. Therefore, if your technology has a low TRL, it is important to keep up with the latest advancements to improve reliability and performance.


How can I calculate the TRL of my new product?

There are a few different ways to calculate the TRL of your new product. One method is to use the Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) tool, available for download from Innovolo.


Who might be interested in my TRL?

There are a few different groups of people who might be interested in your TRL. These include potential investors, customers, and partners.

  • Investors. Investors may want to know your TRL to assess your technology’s risk involved in investing. Customers may want to know your TRL to make an informed decision about whether to purchase your product.
  • Partners. Potential partners may want to know your TRL to assess the level of commitment required to work with you.
  • Grant agencies. Grant agencies may want to know your TRL to assess the likelihood of your technology being successfully commercialised.


When should I start worrying about the TRL of my new product? 

Assessing technology readiness levels is important during any new technology development process. The purpose of TRLs is to track the progress of technology from its conceptual phase through its eventual integration into a larger system of mature technology.

Generally speaking, you should start worrying about the TRL rating of your new product when it reaches level 5. At this point, you should sufficiently develop the technology to demonstrate basic functionality in a realistic environment. If your technology is not yet at level 5, significant technical risks still need to be addressed. Once your technology reaches level 5, you can begin to focus on commercialisation and moving your product into the marketplace.

An advance to the technology readiness level is not trivial or automatic. The most mature technology is only advanced through systematic and careful technology development and testing program. This process can be time-consuming and expensive, so it is important to ensure that you have the resources to support it.

Detailed guidance on how to increase the TRL of your new product is outside the scope of this article, but there are a few general tips that may be useful:

  • Make sure you clearly understand what technology readiness levels mean and what is required at each level; this will help set realistic goals for your technology development program.
  • Work with experienced partners who can provide you with guidance and support.
  • Develop a comprehensive testing and validation plan to ensure that your technology meets all the requirements.
  • Be prepared to invest the time and resources required to reach the highest TRL levels, which will increase the chances of commercial success.


When might TRL be less important?

There are a few situations when the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) may not be as important. These include if you are not planning to commercialise your technology, are not seeking investment or funding for your technology, or are not looking for partners or customers for your technology. In these cases, TRL can still be a useful tool for assessing technology readiness, but it may not be as important. For example, suppose you are not planning to commercialise your technology. In that case, you may not need to worry about achieving a high TRL. However, a higher TRL may be more important if you seek investment or funding for your technology. Similarly, a higher TRL may be more important if you are looking for partners or customers for your technology.

It is important to carry out future research to increase TRL if you want to commercialise your technology or take it to the next stage; this is because TRL measures the maturity of your technology and can help you identify areas where further research is required. It can also assess the risk involved in investing in your technology.


Are there any benefits to having a high TRL?

Yes, there are a few benefits to having a high TRL. These include increased reliability, improved performance, and reduced risks.

Technology with a high TRL is more reliable than one with a low TRL because technology with a high TRL has undergone more testing and development and is, therefore, less likely to experience problems.

Technology with a high TRL is also likely to perform better than one with a low TRL because the more developed technology is typically more refined and efficient.

Finally, technology with a high TRL is associated with reduced risks; this is because the more developed technology has a lower risk of failure and is less likely to experience unforeseen problems.


Why might TRL matter more for some products than others?

There are a few reasons why the maturity level might matter more for some products than others. These include the complexity, the stage of development, and the product’s intended use.

Having detailed guidance on TRLs backed by scientific research can be helpful when trying to assess the readiness of your technology. However, TRL is only one tool that should be used when assessing the readiness of your technology. Other factors, such as the complexity and the stage of development of your product, may also be important to consider.


How might TRL change over time?

As projects progress, the technology level will likely increase; this is because, as projects move from the conceptual phase to the development phase to the implementation phase, the technology becomes more developed and refined.

Organisations need to assess during the development process of any new technology. By using TRL as a starting point, you can identify what work still needs to be done to increase the TRL of your product; this will ensure that your product is ready for commercialisation when it reaches the marketplace.


Who would be responsible for tracking the technical maturity of my product during development?

As the person responsible for overseeing a product’s development, it falls to the project manager to track the technical maturity of the product; this involves assessing the current state of the product and its readiness for release and keeping an eye on future trends that could impact its performance. By tracking the technical maturity, the project manager can ensure that it meets the necessary standards for release and remains competitive in the marketplace.

Additionally, you can use this information to identify areas where further development is needed, either to improve the product’s performance or to address future trends. Finally, by tracking the technical maturity, the project manager can ensure that it meets the highest standards and remains at the forefront of its field.


What can I do if TRL is out of my control?

Technology readiness levels do not always progress linearly, no matter how much we want them to. Sometimes, the technology gets “stuck” at a certain TRL due to constraints beyond our control. In these cases, it is important to remember that TRL is only one metric of success and that other factors contribute to the success of a technology.

For example, even if a technology project is “stuck” at TRL 4, it may still be successful if it has strong market potential or can solve an important problem. In other words, don’t get too discouraged if your technology’s TRL isn’t progressing as you’d like. There are many other ways to measure success, and your technology may still be successful even if it doesn’t have a high TRL.


What are the basic principles of TRLs?

Level 1

Basic principles observed and reported: Level 1 technology readiness is the lowest technology readiness level. At this level, scientific research begins to be translated into applied research and development. An example of technology at Level 1 readiness is a paper study of a technology’s basic properties. Paper studies are important because they help scientists to understand the technology’s potential applications and limitations. However, they are also very limited in scope and cannot be used to develop working prototypes or products. As such, technologies at Level 1 readiness are typically not ready for commercialisation or large-scale production.

Level 2

Technology concept and/or application formulated. Level 2 technology readiness means that the technology concept and/or application has been formulated. This level marks the beginning of invention, where basic principles are observed, and you can invent practical applications. However, these applications are speculative, and there may be no proof or detailed analysis to support the assumptions. Examples are limited to analytic studies. This technology readiness level is important because it provides a foundation for further development. Without a basic understanding of the technology, it would be difficult to move on to more complex applications. However, Level 2 technology readiness is just the first step in a long journey toward practical implementation.

Level 3

Analytical and experimental critical function and/or characteristic proof of concept. Level 3 is all about proof of concept; this is where analytical and experimental studies are undertaken to validate the predictions made about separate elements of the technology. These studies take place in a laboratory setting, and they help show that the technology is feasible and effective. Active research and development are also initiated to improve the technology further. Ultimately, Level 3 demonstrates that the technology is ready for real-world applications.

Level 4

Component and/or breadboard validation in a laboratory environment. Level 4 on the TRL scale indicates that technology has been successfully tested in a laboratory environment; basic technological components have been integrated and shown to work together. While this is a lower level of fidelity than the eventual system, it is still an important step in the development process. Success at this stage helps ensure that technology will be ready for use in an operational setting.

Level 5

Component and/or breadboard validation in a relevant environment. A technology reaches Level 5 when the basic technological components are integrated with reasonably realistic supporting elements so they can be tested in a simulated environment; this allows for a more accurate prediction of technology performance in an operational environment. Reaching Level 5 is a significant milestone. The technology is much closer to being deployed in an operational setting; this can help increase confidence in the technology and pave the way for future success.

Level 6

System/subsystem model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment. A technology at TRL 6 has been tested in a relevant environment and is a major step up from TRL 5; it is much closer to being ready for real-world use. To reach TRL 6, technology must go through rigorous tests to ensure that it is safe and effective; this can be a lengthy and expensive process, but it is essential to ensure that the technology is ready for market. Once technology reaches TRL 6, it is typically ready for commercialisation and mass production.

Level 7

System prototype demonstration in an operational environment. TRL 7 prototype demonstrations typically occur in an operational environment such as an aircraft, vehicle, or space; this represents a major technology readiness step up from TRL 6. In addition, it requires the demonstration of an actual system prototype. In many cases, the prototype at TRL 7 is near or at the planned operational system; this gives engineers and developers a chance to see how the technology performs in a realistic setting and make any necessary modifications before deploying it on a large scale. Such demonstrations are vital for ensuring that new technologies are ready for use in real-world situations.

Level 8

The actual system was completed and qualified through test and demonstration. Level 8 on the TRL scale means that the technology has been proven to work in its final form and under expected conditions; it is ready for use in a real-world scenario, such as in a weapon system. To reach Level 8, the technology must undergo extensive testing to meet all design specifications. Once it has been shown to work effectively under various conditions, it can be considered ready for practical use. Level 8 is usually the highest TRL that can be achieved, representing the end of true system development.

Level 9

The actual system has been proven through successful mission operations. TRL Level nine is the highest TRL on the scale and means that technology has been proven to work in an operational setting; it has completed all mission requirements and is now being used in its intended environment. To reach TRL nine, a technology must undergo extensive testing and evaluation to ensure that it can perform as intended. Once effective in an operational setting, it can be considered ready for widespread use. As a result, TRL 9 technologies are typically used on a large scale and significantly impact the world.


The use of Technology Readiness Levels by NASA

As an aerospace engineer knows, the successful development of new technologies is essential for advancing space exploration. However, developing new technologies is a complex and time-consuming process that often involves multiple iterations and testing phases. To help streamline this, NASA adopted TRLs in the early 1990s to more easily track the progress of new technologies. TRLs provide a clear and concise roadmap for technology development, from initial concept to widespread use; this makes it easier for engineers and developers to understand where a technology is in its lifecycle and what needs to be done to move it forward. TRLs are also a valuable tool for project managers. They can use TRLs to assess the risks and potential rewards of investing in new technologies.

When technology is at stage 1, scientific study has begun. Those findings are being converted into future research and development. When the fundamental concepts have been researched, and practical applications can be applied to those first findings, TRL 2 occurs. It is extremely speculative because there is no experimental proof of concept for the TRL 2 technology.

When technology development and evaluation begin, it is raised to TRL 3. At this level, analytical and lab research is usually required to determine if a technology is viable and ready to continue through the development process. A proof-of-concept model is frequently created during TRL 3.

The stage of TRL 4 is reached once the proof-of-concept technology has been implemented. During this level, many component components are put together and tested separately.

A breadboard technology has not yet achieved TRL 5. In contrast, a technology that has already reached TRL 5 is a breadboard technology and must be subjected to greater testing than one that has only reached TRL 4. In addition, simulations should be conducted in environments as close to real-life as possible.

When the testing of TRL 5 is completed, a technology may move on to TRL 6. For example, a technology with a complete prototype or representational model is at TRL 6.

The Level 7 technology requires a working model or prototype to be demonstrated in a space environment. TRL 8 technology has been tested and “flight-qualified,” and it’s ready for use in an existing technology or technology system. When a technical innovation has been “flight-proven” during a successful mission, it can be TRL 9.


The adoption of TRLs by the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) is the space agency of the European Union (EU). Its mission is to “shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.” ESA achieves this by supporting the development of new technologies through its TRL program. Similar to NASA’s TRL program, ESA’s TRL program is a way to track the progress of new technologies and assess their readiness for space exploration. However, there are some key differences between the two programs.

ESA’s TRL program is also more focused on commercialising new technologies; this is evident in that TRLs 7 to 12 deal with some form of technology demonstration in a real-world environment. For example, TRL 7 requires that technology be demonstrated in a relevant environment, TRL 8 requires that the technology be “flight-qualified,” and TRL 9 requires that the technology be “flight-proven.” This focus on commercialisation is in line with ESA’s mission to ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe.

TRLs are a valuable tool for anyone involved in developing new technologies, whether for space exploration or some other application. They provide a way to track the progress of technology and assess its readiness for use.


Brief History of TRLs

  • 1974. Stan Sadin originated the concept of TRL at NASA Headquarters in 1974. At the time, Ray Chase was a member of NASA’s Jupiter Orbiter Project. Stan Sadin suggested that Mr Chase use this technique to assess the technology readiness of the proposed JPL Jupiter Orbiter spacecraft design at Mr Chase’s request. Following this, Mr Chase spent a year at NASA Headquarters assisting Mr Sadin in formalising the TRL approach.
  • The 1990s. In the 1990s, the TRLs were adopted by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for all technology development programs.
  • 1995. John C. Mankins proposed descriptions of each TRL in a white paper, formalising TRLs for the first time.
  • 1999. In 1999, the GAO (Government Accountability Office) recommended that the Department of Defense (DOD) adopt the use of technology readiness levels (TRLs). NASA originally developed them to assess the readiness of the technology for space exploration missions. The GAO believed that TRLs could help assess the readiness of DOD technologies for acquisition and fielding decisions. In response to the GAO recommendation, DOD issued a directive in 2000 that required the use of TRLs in all major weapon systems acquisition programs. Since then, TRLs have been widely used within DOD and other federal agencies and commercial organisations.
  • 2002. TRLs were first described in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) in 2002.
  • 2013. In 2013, ASTM International published a standard guide for technology readiness levels (TRLs).


How to move from TRL 1 to TRL 2 in your product development project:

TRL1 is the initial level of technology readiness, while TRL2 is the next level of readiness. At TRL2, you have started to apply R&D to your basic scientific principles and identified your first applications. You may have also conducted experiments to test the suitability of those applications. However, you still need to evidence your progress; this can be done through 3rd party verified test data or published academic papers. Once you have at least one technology application that 3rd party data or published papers have verified, you will have reached TRL.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 1 to TRL 2 are:

  • Identify the first applications. Any new technology must first be applied to the real world before it can be adopted on a widespread basis; this means figuring out how your technology can be used to solve existing problems or meet existing needs. For example, suppose you have invented a new type of battery. In that case, you will need to identify applications that can benefit from the battery’s unique properties. It can be used in mobile devices that require a long-lasting power source or in electric vehicles that need to travel a long distance on a single charge. Once you have identified potential applications for your technology, you can begin developing and marketing products that incorporate it. By taking this first step, you hope to bring your new invention to the marketplace and make it available to consumers.
  • Conduct experiments to test the suitability of those applications. Depending on the product, these experiments can be carried out in a lab setting or the field. Testing the applications makes it possible to identify any issues that need to be addressed before moving to the next stage. In addition, these experiments can help assess the product’s potential and its usefulness for the intended purpose. By carrying out careful and thorough experiments, it is possible to obtain valuable data that can help to make informed decisions about the product and its development.
  • Evidence of your progress. It is important to track and measure progress to ensure that you are moving in the right direction when it comes to developing new technology. There are several ways to do this. Still, one of the most reliable methods is through third-party verified test data or published academic papers. This type of evidence can provide an objective assessment of your progress and help to identify areas that need further development. In addition, you can also use it to compare your progress with other similar projects, allowing you to see where you stand with the competition. Furthermore, this type of evidence can help secure funding or partners for your project. It provides a clear demonstration of the potential for success.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL2. These can include:

  • Finding the right applications for your technology. This can be not easy if you don’t have much experience in the industry you’re working in. Find a partner who can help you with application identification; this could be another company or an organisation that focuses on helping startups.
  • Developing a product that is suitable for those applications. This can be difficult if your technology is still in its early stages of development. Develop a prototype that can be tested in the field; this will help you test your product’s suitability for the identified applications.
  • Obtaining evidence that a third party can verify. This can be difficult if your experiments are still in the early stages or if you don’t have any data to share yet. Share your progress with others in the industry; this will help you get feedback from people familiar with the challenges you’re facing; this does come with a warning around IP; however, be sure to protect your ideas!


How to move from TRL 2 to TRL 3 in your product development project:

The first step in moving from TRL 2 to TRL 3 is identifying the key technical risks associated with the technology. These risks can be divided into two main categories: technical feasibility and commercial viability. For each category, several sub-risks must be considered and addressed. Once the key risks have been identified, a plan can be developed to mitigate them. This plan should include both short-term and long-term actions. In the short term, efforts should reduce the uncertainty associated with the technology. This can be done through additional experimentation or developing prototypes for specific applications.

In the long term, the goal should be to demonstrate commercial viability. This can be done by partnering with companies interested in using the technology or developing a product that can be sold to customers.

As your technology matures and you move closer to commercialisation, it is important to keep in mind the needs of your target market. This includes understanding their requirements, pain points, and what they are willing to pay for a solution. It is also important to consider the regulatory environment where your product will be used. This can have a major impact on the commercial viability of your technology.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 2 to TRL 3 are:

  • Conducting analysis or experiments aimed at predicting future performance. When technology readiness is at TRL2, it is still in the early stages of development. This means that there is limited data on how the technology will perform in real-world conditions. As a result, conducting analysis or experiments at this stage is essential for understanding how the technology is likely to behave in different scenarios. This information can then be used to make predictions about future performance and identify potential areas for improvement or future research. By understanding the potential limitations of the technology, organisations can make informed decisions about whether or not to proceed with its development.
  • Testing any subsystems or components in the lab. Testing is a crucial step in developing any new technology or product. By verifying that subsystems and components meet the required specifications, developers can be confident that they will perform as intended in a real-world setting. In the laboratory, engineers can put new products through various tests, simulating different conditions and stressors; this helps identify any potential problems before the product is released to the public. While some companies choose to skip this step to save time and money, doing so can lead to costly recalls and unexpected downtime. As a result, it is always worth taking the time to test new products before bringing them to market thoroughly.
  • Evidence of your progress. You can do this through 3rd party verified test data or published academic papers.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL3. These can include:

  • Obtaining funding and resources to continue the project. To address this challenge, it is important to have a clear roadmap and milestones that can be used to justify the investment.
  • Developing a prototype that is ready for testing in a real-world setting. This can be difficult since it often necessitates a significant investment of time and money. To overcome this problem, you’ll need to have a clear strategy for how the prototype will be built and tested.
  • Ensuring that the technology meets the required standards for use in practice. This can be difficult as there may be several factors to consider, such as safety, reliability, and efficiency. To address this challenge, you’ll need to understand the technology and the application it will be used and have the ability to communicate this to others.


‍How to move from TRL 3 to TRL 4 in your product development project:

To move from TRL 3 to TRL 4 in your product development project, you must demonstrate that your product or technology works as intended under real-world conditions; this involves demonstrating the feasibility and effectiveness of your product in a controlled environment. Once you have done this, you can scale up your production and commercialise your product. However, reaching TRL 4 is not always easy, and you may face challenges such as financing, regulations, and market acceptance. By understanding these challenges and taking steps to address them, you can increase your chances of success and reach your goal of commercialisation.

TRL4 means that you have completed the integration and testing of the technology into its first application. TRL3 means that you have conducted analysis or experiments to predict future performance and tested subsystems or components in the lab.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 3 to TRL 4 are:

  • Testing the larger subsystems in the lab. Getting a technology to work in the lab is one thing, but integrating it into a larger system is another. When developing new technology, it’s important to keep the end goal and design with applicability in mind. When it comes time to test in a larger subsystem, the technology will be more likely to fit seamlessly. Keep in mind the saying - “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” In other words, even if all the individual components of a system are working correctly, they may not work correctly together. It’s important to consider how each component will interact with the others and account for that in the design and testing phases. By keeping applicability in mind from the start, you can avoid costly redesigns down the road.
  • Validation of these systems for the application you are targeting. The first application of new technology requires an in-depth examination of the product’s requirements and specifications. To accomplish this, you’ll need to figure out what has to be done to ensure that the technology works as expected in its initial implementation. For example, you may need to perform environmental testing to ensure the technology can function in the desired conditions.
  • Identifying what needs to be done to integrate the technology into its first application. One of the key challenges in moving a new technology from the laboratory to the marketplace is understanding what needs to be done to integrate the technology into its first application. You’ll need to clearly understand the technology’s requirements and specifications to do this. What are the dimensions of the technology? What are the power requirements? What are the interface requirements? What are the environmental conditions under which it will operate? Once you have a good understanding of these factors, you can begin to identify potential applications for the technology. The next step is to assess the feasibility of integrating the technology into each potential application. This assessment will require you to consider several factors, including cost, risk, and benefits. Only by carefully evaluating all of these factors can you decide whether or not to proceed with a particular application.
  • Developing a plan for reaching TRL 4. To move from TRL3 to TRL4, several tasks must be completed, including achieving a working prototype, demonstrating the feasibility of the technology, and conducting market research. Developing a roadmap for reaching TRL4 is essential for ensuring that all of these tasks are completed quickly and efficiently. By laying out a clear plan of action, you can avoid expensive delays and ensure that your technology is ready for the marketplace. With a well-defined roadmap in place, you can confidently move forward with taking your technology to the next level.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL4. These can include:

  • Lack of access to a suitable testing environment. To address this, you may need to create a makeshift lab or find a partner who can provide access to the necessary resources.
  • Lack of technical expertise. Suppose you’re having difficulty completing validation and integration tasks. In that case, you may need to hire additional team members with the required skills. Consider looking for outside assistance or materials to assist you with your project to address this problem.
  • Time and budget constraints. All product development projects face limitations in terms of time and money. However, it’s important to be realistic about what you can achieve within the given timeframe and make sure all tasks are aligned with the overall goal of reaching TRL 4 and addressing any potential bottlenecks.
  • Inability to test all subsystems and components. In some cases, you may not be able to test every subsystem and component due to time or budget constraints. In these situations, it’s important to prioritise the most important components and ensure that they are validated through testing.

‍Make sure you are aware of these possible challenges and have contingencies in place so that they don’t hold up your project.


‍How to move from TRL 4 to TRL 5 in your product development project:

To move from TRL4 to TRL5 in your product development project, you need to demonstrate that the technology works in an acceptable way to your customers. This can be done through trials or other forms of customer feedback. Trials will help you gather data on how the technology performs in a real-world environment. At the same time, customer feedback will give you insight into whether or not the technology meets your target market’s needs. Once you have gathered this information, you can make necessary adjustments to your product before taking it to market. By taking the time to reach TRL5, you can ensure that your product is ready for success.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 4 to TRL 5 are:

  • Test the technology with customers or in a simulated customer environment. First, you must define your target market and locate people interested in testing the technology. You must develop a test environment that mimics how you will use the technology in reality. For example, suppose you are developing a new life jacket. In that case, you might put it through its paces in a pool with a wave machine with people wearing different clothes to see how well it works.
  • Integrate the technology into a system that simulates the systems it will be integrated into in the real world. Further to testing the technology in a simulated user environment, you must also test it in a simulated real-world environment; this can be done by integrating the technology into a physical system that replicates how it will be used. For example, suppose you are developing a new life jacket. In that case, you might put it through its paces in a very cold pool with a wave machine that simulates the waves and currents found in the North Sea.
  • Evaluate the results of the trials. After testing the technology in both a simulated and real-world environment, you must analyse the results to see if it is viable for commercialisation. This evaluation should include meaningful feedback from both customers and testers.

To move from TRL 4 to TRL 5, you must demonstrate that the technology works in an acceptable way to your customers.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL5. These can include:

  • Defining the target market and locating people interested in testing the technology. This can be difficult, as you need to find people who are both willing and able to test your technology and represent your target market. To address this challenge, you might consider using focus groups or conducting surveys. For example, you could survey people who work in a particular industry to see if they would be interested in using your technology.
  • Develop a test environment that mimics how you will use the technology in reality. This can be not easy, as creating a realistic testing environment is often expensive and time-consuming. You may need to enlist the help of experts to create an accurate simulation, or you may need to create a virtual environment that replicates the real world.
  • Evaluating the results of the trials. This can be difficult, as you need to analyse many data to determine whether the technology is viable for commercialisation. You may need to employ experts to help you with this analysis.

‍Addressing the challenges, you face along the way can be difficult. Still, it is important to remember that they are not insurmountable. By planning and allocating the necessary resources, you should be able to overcome any challenges that stand in your way.

How to move from TRL 5 to TRL 6 in your product development project:

There are a few key things to keep in mind when moving from TRL5 to TRL6 in your product development project. First, it is important to ensure that your technology is fully integrated. This means ensuring that all components are properly connected and that the system is functioning as intended. Next, you will need to produce a complete prototype of the system. This prototype should represent the final product and show that the system is viable and effective.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 5 to TRL 6 are:

  • Produce a complete prototype. To create a working prototype, you must first understand all of the technical constraints involved; this means understanding the materials, manufacturing processes, and assembly methods used. Once you have this knowledge, you can start to design a prototype that meets all of the requirements. The prototype will need to be designed for manufacturability. It can be easily and cheaply produced using the available resources. It should also be designed for testing to identify and correct any potential problems before mass production begins.
  • Test the prototype in a simulated user environment. As you move from developing a prototype to deploying a product, it’s important to test it in a realistic environment; this allows you to identify any potential issues with the technology and ensure that it meets customer needs. A simulated user environment is ideal for testing a product before full-scale deployment. By replicating the conditions of the real world, you can verify that the product performs as expected and make any necessary tweaks. This kind of testing is essential for ensuring a successful launch. By taking the time to test in a simulated user environment, you can help ensure that your product is ready for the rigours of the real world.

To move from TRL 5 to TRL6, you must also be able to evidence the success of your trials. You could do this through customer feedback, data gathered from the trials themselves, or other reporting mechanisms.

‍There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL6. These can include:

  • Lack of funding. Prototypes are often expensive to create, and many businesses may not have the financial means. To address this, it’s critical to establish a plan for how you’ll finance and carry out the prototype.
  • Lack of technical expertise. It’s tough to create a prototype from the ground up and may require the assistance of other professionals. To manage this, it’s critical to have a clear plan for who will be in command of what aspects of the prototype creation process.
  • Lack of time. Building a prototype in a short amount of time might be difficult. You’ll need a clear timeline and milestones to keep you on track to overcome this.

Moving from TRL 5 to TRL 6 can be a daunting task, but it’s achievable with preparation and planning. By understanding the key steps involved and the challenges you may face along the way, you’ll be well to reach the final stage of product development.


How to move from TRL 6 to TRL 7 in your product development project:

TRL6 is when technology has proven viable and ready for product development. At the same time, TRL7 is the stage at which technology has been proven to be mature and ready for widespread deployment.

‍The key steps involved in moving from TRL 6 to TRL 7 are:

  • Producing and testing multiple prototypes. You need to have a solid understanding of your technology and what is required to achieve commercial viability. You also need to effectively communicate with all stakeholders, including customers, so that everyone understands the product and its value proposition.
  • Achieving commercially viable performance in that testing. Your product needs to meet or exceed customer expectations of performance, quality, and value.
  • Ready to start product development. Once you have met the above criteria, you are ready to begin full-scale product development and bring your innovation to market.
  • Documenting the maturity of your technology. This can be done through various means such as verification trials or documented hours invested in research and development.

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL7. These can include:

  • Lack of funding or support. To overcome this, you may need to seek outside funding or partnerships to help support your product development efforts.
  • Lack of technical expertise. Suppose you don’t have the necessary technical skills in-house. In that case, you may need to bring on additional experts to help guide your project to success.
  • Lack of market demand. Before investing a lot of time and resources into product development, ensure there is a market for your innovation rather than trusting that the market will materialise once your product is finished.
  • Inability to produce a prototype that meets customer expectations. This can be a big roadblock in reaching TRL7. Make sure you have a clear understanding of what is required to make your prototype successful and how to measure that success.
  • Unclear customer need or value proposition. Suppose customers don’t understand the value of your product. In that case, it will be difficult to get them on board with your development efforts. Make sure you can articulate the value of your product in a way that resonates with customers.
  • Competing products with more established technologies. In this case, you will need to focus on developing a unique selling point for your product that sets it apart from the competition.
  • Lack of expertise or know-how in certain areas. If you lack specific expertise, you may need to outsource those activities to other companies or individuals who have the necessary skills.


How to move from TRL 7 to TRL 8 in your product development project:

TRL7 is the stage at which technology has been tested and proven to work in a prototype form. TRL8 is when technology has been shown to work in a commercial setting, with all the necessary durability and performance requirements.

‍The key steps involved in moving from TRL 7 to TRL 8 are:

  • Test prototypes in a commercial setting. You need to find a customer or client willing to test your technology in their setting; this will give you the real-world data to prove that it works well and is ready for market.
  • Ensure durability and performance meet required levels. To complete this, you must evaluate the technology in various settings and ensure that it satisfies the necessary criteria. You and your team will pre-set these criteria based on what is required for commercial success.
  • Refine the production design. Once you have data from the commercial testing, it’s time to start refining the production design, ensuring that the technology is ready for full-scale manufacture and that all the requirements are in place.
  • Freeze the production design. The final step is to freeze the production design. The technology is essentially finished, and no further modifications can be made without disrupting or causing issues throughout the manufacturing process; this implies you’re ready to produce the technology in large quantities and suitable for commercialisation.

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL8. These can include:

  • Lack of customer or client interest. Without a customer or client willing to test your technology, it can be difficult to move beyond TRL 7 because you need real-world data to prove that the technology works and is ready for market. You may need to do more marketing or networking to find the right partners to overcome this.
  • Lack of data from commercial testing. Suppose you don’t have a lot of data from your prototypes in a commercial setting. In that case, it can be difficult to prove that the technology is ready for market. You can resolve this by doing more testing with different customers and clients.
  • Poor durability or performance. It’s challenging to reach TRL 8 if your technology does not fulfil the required durability or performance levels; this may be addressed by conducting more testing and evaluations to determine the problems and how to correct them.
  • Unable to freeze the production design. Suppose you cannot freeze the design for production because of modifications requested by the client or customer. It might be tough to go beyond TRL 7; this problem may be addressed by agreeing on a change freeze with the client or customer, ensuring that all changes are made before beginning production.


How to move from TRL 8 to TRL 9 in your product development project:

TRL8 is when technology has been proven to work and be durable in a commercial setting. Finally, TRL9 is the point at which technology is in production in commercial volumes.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 8 to TRL 9 are:

  • Increasing production volume. This can be done by scaling up production or finding new customers.
  • Verifying that the volume of products in use by your customers is significant. You can look at customer feedback, sales data, or user numbers.

When moving from TRL 8 to TRL 9, it’s important to consider how your technology compares to others in terms of maturity. You may need to do additional work to bring your technology up to par with the best in the industry.

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL9. These can include:

  • Scaling up production. This can be difficult if you don’t have the necessary resources; this may be overcome by partnering with a company with the necessary infrastructure or finding new investors.
  • Get your technology adopted by more customers. It might be tough to implement if you don’t have a successful sales and marketing plan in place. You could need to spend money on customer outreach, public relations, and advertising.
  • Make sure your technology is on par with the best in the industry. This can be a daunting task, but it’s important to understand what’s required to make your technology the best it can be.

How to move from TRL 9 to TRL 10 in your product development project:

TRL9 is the point where you have a commercial product in volume production. The product being manufactured verifies that the technology works and is reliable. TRL10 is the point where your technology has been replicated across several applications. You have extensive warranty data that confirm performance and durability meet targets in the real world.

The key steps involved in moving from TRL 9 to TRL 10 are:

  • Replicate your technology across several applications. To do this, you need to find new applications or partners willing to use your technology.
  • Extensively test your technology in the real world. This means testing it in different environments and under different conditions. You need to make sure it performs well and is durable.
  • Gather data on performance and durability. This data should confirm that your technology meets its target goals in the real world. To get this data, you need to track customer usage and feedback.
  • Demonstrate extensive warranty data that confirm performance and durability meet target in the real world. This will show that your technology is reliable and that customers are happy with it.

There are certain challenges you may face when trying to reach TRL10. These can include:

  • Developing a technology that can be replicated across several applications. This can be difficult if your technology is specific to a certain industry or application.
  • Testing your technology in the real world. This can be expensive and time-consuming. To overcome this, you need to have a clear plan for how you will test your technology.
  • Gathering data on performance and durability. This can be difficult if you do not have access to the right data or if it is hard to track customer usage and feedback.
  • Demonstrating extensive warranty data that confirm performance and durability meet targets in the real world. This can be difficult if your technology has not been tested extensively in the real world.


Key Takeways