Top 8 Risks of Outsourcing Technical Translation Services: How to Avoid Them

Learning Centre > Top 8 Risks of Outsourcing Technical Translation Services: How to Avoid Them

This article will discuss some of the top risks of outsourcing translation services and how to avoid them.

 This article will discuss some of the top risks of outsourcing translation services and how to avoid them. This article will discuss some of the top risks of outsourcing translation services and how to avoid them.
Contents

If you're thinking of outsourcing your technical translation services, you must be aware of the risks involved. Many potential pitfalls can occur when working with a translation company. If you're not careful, you could lose money or compromise the quality of your translations. This article will discuss some of the top risks of outsourcing translation services and how to avoid them.

Mistake 1: Not taking the target audience into account

Not considering the target audience is a huge mistake when outsourcing your technical translation services. It's important to remember that the text you're producing is for a specific target audience, and if you don't consider them, you're not addressing anyone at all. The target group must understand what you're saying, so make sure to use language that they'll be able to understand. For example, don't use an academic style if your text is intended for children. This example may seem a bit exaggerated, but disregarding the target audience happens more often than you think.

Two things are important; knowing exactly what you want to convey and how you go about it.

Always ask yourself:

Mistake 2: Ignoring cultural nuances

When translating technical content, it's important to remember that different cultures have different ways of understanding and using technical terms. What may be clear in one culture could be incomprehensible in another. For example, "software" can mean different things in different cultures. In some cultures, it refers to the programs installed on a computer, while in others it may refer to the computer itself. If you're not careful, you could translate a term incorrectly, confusing your readers.

For example, look at the cultural differences between the Dutch and the Belgians. For us English, the languages seem pretty much the same. But they are not the same. So then in a business context, the Dutch would be happy to do business with the competition, whereas this is inconceivable in Belgium.

Because the Dutch have a different understanding of technical terms than the Belgians, it's important to be extra careful when translating for these audiences. Make sure you understand the cultural nuances of your target audience and how they use technical terms before starting your translation project.

Ask yourself:

Mistake 3: Translators without technical speciality

If you're working with a translation company, ensure that the translators they assign to your project have a technical background or speciality. Translating technical content requires a deep understanding of the subject matter, and if the translator doesn't have this knowledge, they won't be able to produce an accurate translation; this could lead to serious errors in your text that could cost you time and money to fix.

Always ask about their qualifications and experience when looking for a technical translator. Make sure they have a background in the technology field you're working in and are familiar with the terminology used in your industry. Also, ask to see samples of their work to get an idea of their writing style and ability to translate technical content accurately.

Ask yourself:

Mistake 4: ‘Oh, in English we can get away with everything’

One of the most common mistakes made by those who are not mother-tongue in English is to assume that because English is the international language of business, they can get away with anything. This simply is not true.

When translating into English, it's important to know the different dialects and regional variations. Just as there are differences between American and British English, there are also differences between Australian, Canadian, and New Zealand English. Each of these dialects has its own unique words, phrases, and grammar rules.

If you're unfamiliar with the regional variations of English, it's important to do your research before starting your translation project; this will help ensure that your text is properly adapted for your target audience.

And then, more importantly, there are legal, safety, health and environmental considerations that come into play. So it’s not just a case of translating the text, but making sure it also covers all the legal aspects for that particular country. For example, most consumer products that appear on the market within the EU, for example, require a CE marking.

CE directives prescribe that your manual must include warnings regarding any dangers the use of the product could entail. You do this in the relevant member state's official EU language (or languages).

>create list of thought-provoking questions to ask yourself to avoid this mistake

Ask yourself:

Mistake 5: Flouting local laws

When translating for a global audience, it's important to be aware of each country's different laws and regulations. Failure to do so can result in serious legal repercussions.

For example, did you know it's illegal to use certain words and phrases in advertising in the United Kingdom? The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is responsible for enforcing these laws and taking their job very seriously.

Here's a fun fact: what's commonly accepted in one country might be banned in another. So if you're planning on selling your product overseas, it's crucial to ensure that it complies with the local laws and regulations. The same goes for your user manuals and other documentation - if they don't meet the requirements of the country you're selling in, you could face hefty fines.

Of course, government regulators aren't the only ones you need to worry about. If you're selling a physical product, you also need to make sure you can use it in the country where you're selling it. For example, electrical products must have the correct plugs and voltage requirements. Failure to do so could result in some very unhappy customers - and a lot of returned merchandise.

So the next time you're thinking about selling your products or services overseas, take a few minutes to research the local laws and regulations. It's well worth the effort to avoid any potential headaches.

Mistake 6: Forgetting images

It's a bit clumsy if you refer to tables or images that have not been translated. And it happens more often than you think. Tables in images, drawings in your bill of materials (parts list) ... If you choose a translation agency that also knows DTP, they can translate any texts in drawings down to the last detail. What's more, they can do it without losing the original formatting, meaning your documents will look just as professional in another language as in English. So if you're looking for a high-quality translation, make sure you choose an agency that offers DTP services. It'll save you a lot of hassle further down the line.

Mistake 7: The dimensions are not correct at all

As any carpenter knows, measurements are essential for any successful construction project. A well-built table or cabinet requires meticulous planning and precise execution; even a small error can throw off the entire design. The same is true of translations, especially regarding technical terms. A good translator will take the time to research the correct dimensions and ensure that they are accurately conveyed in the target language. Failure to do so can result in a final product that is completely inaccurate and unusable. So if you're planning on translating anything that requires precision, be sure to hire a professional who knows what they're doing. Otherwise, you'll end up with a royal mess on your hands.

Mistake 8: No checks

Good translations are essential. They can mean the difference between life and death in some cases - if you're ordering a pepperoni pizza and the translation says you're ordering a donkey, then you're going to be pretty upset. Mistakes happen, but it's not the end of the world. You just have to make sure you use good translators and carry out good checks. Innovolo sets high standards for translators, translations and quality control. Three pairs of eyes view all our translations. So that you can be sure that no comma is missing, changing the meaning of the whole sentence. And that you know for sure that the abbreviations or dimensions used are correct. We take translation seriously because we know how important it is. So you can rest assured that your message will get across loud and clear.

Good to know; most translation agencies don’t check anything. The translation is finished and no one will look at it anymore. It may be cheaper, but any mistake could cost you dearly… At Innovolo, we believe that quality assurance is essential to ensuring that our clients receive the best possible service. That’s why we have a dedicated QA Manager who oversees our projects. And it’s not just us saying that; our clients have consistently rated us as one of the top Translation providers in the industry. So, what sets us apart? One of the key principles we follow at Innovolo is our “3-pairs-of-eyes” policy; this means that three different team members review every text before it is delivered to the client; this allows us to catch any errors or inconsistencies, and ensure that the final product is of the highest quality.

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If you're thinking of outsourcing your technical translation services, you must be aware of the risks involved. Many potential pitfalls can occur when working with a translation company. If you're not careful, you could lose money or compromise the quality of your translations. This article will discuss some of the top risks of outsourcing translation services and how to avoid them.

Mistake 1: Not taking the target audience into account

Not considering the target audience is a huge mistake when outsourcing your technical translation services. It's important to remember that the text you're producing is for a specific target audience, and if you don't consider them, you're not addressing anyone at all. The target group must understand what you're saying, so make sure to use language that they'll be able to understand. For example, don't use an academic style if your text is intended for children. This example may seem a bit exaggerated, but disregarding the target audience happens more often than you think.

Two things are important; knowing exactly what you want to convey and how you go about it.

Always ask yourself:

  • What is the target audience for your translations?
  • How well do you understand your target audience's needs and preferences?
  • Are you tailoring your translations to meet those needs and preferences?
  • Have you taken cultural differences into account?
  • Are you using language that your target audience will be able to understand?

Mistake 2: Ignoring cultural nuances

When translating technical content, it's important to remember that different cultures have different ways of understanding and using technical terms. What may be clear in one culture could be incomprehensible in another. For example, "software" can mean different things in different cultures. In some cultures, it refers to the programs installed on a computer, while in others it may refer to the computer itself. If you're not careful, you could translate a term incorrectly, confusing your readers.

For example, look at the cultural differences between the Dutch and the Belgians. For us English, the languages seem pretty much the same. But they are not the same. So then in a business context, the Dutch would be happy to do business with the competition, whereas this is inconceivable in Belgium.

Because the Dutch have a different understanding of technical terms than the Belgians, it's important to be extra careful when translating for these audiences. Make sure you understand the cultural nuances of your target audience and how they use technical terms before starting your translation project.

Ask yourself:

  • What are some of the most common cultural nuances between your target audience and other cultures?
  • How well do you understand the cultural nuances of your target audience?
  • What are some of the most commonly misunderstood cultural nuances between your target audience and other cultures?
  • How can you ensure that you're tailoring your translations to meet the needs and preferences of your target audience?

Mistake 3: Translators without technical speciality

If you're working with a translation company, ensure that the translators they assign to your project have a technical background or speciality. Translating technical content requires a deep understanding of the subject matter, and if the translator doesn't have this knowledge, they won't be able to produce an accurate translation; this could lead to serious errors in your text that could cost you time and money to fix.

Always ask about their qualifications and experience when looking for a technical translator. Make sure they have a background in the technology field you're working in and are familiar with the terminology used in your industry. Also, ask to see samples of their work to get an idea of their writing style and ability to translate technical content accurately.

Ask yourself:

  • What qualifications and experience do the translators have?
  • Do they have a background in the technology field you're working in?
  • Are they familiar with the terminology used in your industry?
  • Can you see samples of their work?
  • What is their writing style like?
  • Do they seem able to translate technical content accurately?

Mistake 4: ‘Oh, in English we can get away with everything’

One of the most common mistakes made by those who are not mother-tongue in English is to assume that because English is the international language of business, they can get away with anything. This simply is not true.

When translating into English, it's important to know the different dialects and regional variations. Just as there are differences between American and British English, there are also differences between Australian, Canadian, and New Zealand English. Each of these dialects has its own unique words, phrases, and grammar rules.

If you're unfamiliar with the regional variations of English, it's important to do your research before starting your translation project; this will help ensure that your text is properly adapted for your target audience.

And then, more importantly, there are legal, safety, health and environmental considerations that come into play. So it’s not just a case of translating the text, but making sure it also covers all the legal aspects for that particular country. For example, most consumer products that appear on the market within the EU, for example, require a CE marking.

CE directives prescribe that your manual must include warnings regarding any dangers the use of the product could entail. You do this in the relevant member state's official EU language (or languages).

>create list of thought-provoking questions to ask yourself to avoid this mistake

Ask yourself:

  • What are some of the most common cultural nuances between your target audience and other cultures?
  • How well do you understand the cultural nuances of your target audience?
  • What are some of the most commonly misunderstood cultural nuances between your target audience and other cultures?
  • How can you ensure that you're tailoring your translations to meet the needs and preferences of your target audience?

Mistake 5: Flouting local laws

When translating for a global audience, it's important to be aware of each country's different laws and regulations. Failure to do so can result in serious legal repercussions.

For example, did you know it's illegal to use certain words and phrases in advertising in the United Kingdom? The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is responsible for enforcing these laws and taking their job very seriously.

Here's a fun fact: what's commonly accepted in one country might be banned in another. So if you're planning on selling your product overseas, it's crucial to ensure that it complies with the local laws and regulations. The same goes for your user manuals and other documentation - if they don't meet the requirements of the country you're selling in, you could face hefty fines.

Of course, government regulators aren't the only ones you need to worry about. If you're selling a physical product, you also need to make sure you can use it in the country where you're selling it. For example, electrical products must have the correct plugs and voltage requirements. Failure to do so could result in some very unhappy customers - and a lot of returned merchandise.

So the next time you're thinking about selling your products or services overseas, take a few minutes to research the local laws and regulations. It's well worth the effort to avoid any potential headaches.

Mistake 6: Forgetting images

It's a bit clumsy if you refer to tables or images that have not been translated. And it happens more often than you think. Tables in images, drawings in your bill of materials (parts list) ... If you choose a translation agency that also knows DTP, they can translate any texts in drawings down to the last detail. What's more, they can do it without losing the original formatting, meaning your documents will look just as professional in another language as in English. So if you're looking for a high-quality translation, make sure you choose an agency that offers DTP services. It'll save you a lot of hassle further down the line.

Mistake 7: The dimensions are not correct at all

As any carpenter knows, measurements are essential for any successful construction project. A well-built table or cabinet requires meticulous planning and precise execution; even a small error can throw off the entire design. The same is true of translations, especially regarding technical terms. A good translator will take the time to research the correct dimensions and ensure that they are accurately conveyed in the target language. Failure to do so can result in a final product that is completely inaccurate and unusable. So if you're planning on translating anything that requires precision, be sure to hire a professional who knows what they're doing. Otherwise, you'll end up with a royal mess on your hands.

Mistake 8: No checks

Good translations are essential. They can mean the difference between life and death in some cases - if you're ordering a pepperoni pizza and the translation says you're ordering a donkey, then you're going to be pretty upset. Mistakes happen, but it's not the end of the world. You just have to make sure you use good translators and carry out good checks. Innovolo sets high standards for translators, translations and quality control. Three pairs of eyes view all our translations. So that you can be sure that no comma is missing, changing the meaning of the whole sentence. And that you know for sure that the abbreviations or dimensions used are correct. We take translation seriously because we know how important it is. So you can rest assured that your message will get across loud and clear.

Good to know; most translation agencies don’t check anything. The translation is finished and no one will look at it anymore. It may be cheaper, but any mistake could cost you dearly… At Innovolo, we believe that quality assurance is essential to ensuring that our clients receive the best possible service. That’s why we have a dedicated QA Manager who oversees our projects. And it’s not just us saying that; our clients have consistently rated us as one of the top Translation providers in the industry. So, what sets us apart? One of the key principles we follow at Innovolo is our “3-pairs-of-eyes” policy; this means that three different team members review every text before it is delivered to the client; this allows us to catch any errors or inconsistencies, and ensure that the final product is of the highest quality.

Key Takeways

Join 70+ companies accelerating their product development with Innovolo
Farm+Stable is a client of Innovolo, a product development as a service provider offering R&D teams globally extra capacity, capability, and momentum in their product development and obsolescence management projects. As a company that specializes in the development and engineering of products for the agriculture and construction industries, Farm+Stable has benefited from Innovolo's expertise in helping to bring new products to market quickly and efficiently. In particular, Farm+Stable has been able to rely on Innovolo's team of experienced engineers to help with the design and development of a new line of products that are designed to be more durable and longer-lasting than previous models. With Innovolo's help, Farm+Stable has been able to bring these new products to market in a timely manner, and they have been well-received by customers. Thanks to Innovolo's innovative product development solutions, Farm+Stable has been able to stay ahead of the competition and continue to grow their business.
Innovolo is a product development as a service provider. It offers R&D teams globally extra capacity, capability, and momentum in their product development and obsolescence management projects. Its services are used by clients in a variety of industries, including automotive, aerospace, consumer electronics, and medical devices. One of its clients is Kawneer, a leading manufacturer of aluminum products for the architectural and construction industries. Kawneer has been using Innovolo's services to help develop new products and to manage the obsolescence of its existing products. Thanks to Innovolo, Kawneer has been able to speed up its product development cycle and to reduce its costs. As a result, Kawneer has been able to bring new products to market faster and to better meet the needs of its customers.

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