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TRIZ Anti-Weight Principle

Have you ever wondered how a kayak can float even though it's made of heavy materials like wood or metal? The answer lies in the TRIZ anti-weight principle. This principle states that to compensate for the weight of an object, we can merge it with other things that provide lift. So in the case of a kayak, by adding foam floats into the hull, we create a much lighter vessel than water and, therefore, able to float. This same principle can be seen in aerostatic aeroplanes, which contain lighter-than-air pockets that allow them to stay afloat, and hot-air or helium balloons, which use buoyancy to stay aloft. Even fish use this principle, with their swim-bladders acting as natural weights that help maintain their depth in the water. And did you know that even lawnmowers use the anti-weight principle? For example, the cutting blade on a Flymo produces a lift, which helps to keep the mower light and easy to manoeuvre.
So next time you see a kayak floating serenely on the water or a balloon drifting through the sky, remember the TRIZ anti-weight principle and thank those clever engineers who came up with it!

Have you ever wondered how a kayak can float even though it's made of heavy materials like wood or metal? The answer lies in the TRIZ anti-weight principle.

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