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TRIZ Principle 20: Continuity of Useful Action

Inventive problem solving, or TRIZ as it is commonly known, is "the next evolutionary step in creating an organized and systematic approach to problem-solving." This theory was first developed in the Soviet Union in the 1940s, but it has since been adopted by businesses and individuals all over the world. TRIZ provides a structured approach to identify potential solutions to problems, and it has been shown to be particularly effective in manufacturing and engineering.

One of the key principles of TRIZ is continuity of useful action. This principle states that not all parts of all machines are being optimally used all of the time. In other words, there is always room for improvement. By reducing idle time and putting it to better use, we can improve the efficiency of our machines. For example, a reciprocating saw has a dead time at the end of each stroke which can be eliminated by using a circular saw. Or, alternatively, we can put the reciprocation to good use by actuating a pump which removes the sawdust. By applying the principles of TRIZ, we can continue to find new and innovative ways to improve our machines and processes.

This principle states that not all parts of all machines are being optimally used all of the time. In other words, there is always room for improvement.

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