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TRIZ Principle 9: Prior Counteraction

When you are doing something that has both good and bad effects, you can try to control the harmful effects. For example, you can make things out of ice or dung that will melt away or use a lead apron when getting X-rays. Another example is to create beforehand stresses in an object that will oppose known undesirable working stresses later on. This is called the principle of prior counteraction.
There are many ways to apply the principle of prior counteraction. TRIZ provides a systematic way to find solutions that other people may not have thought of before. When you use TRIZ, you first identify the problem and then look for solutions that have been used in similar situations.
You can also use TRIZ to generate new ideas for solutions.
Applying the principle of prior counteraction can help you find solutions to problems that have both good and bad effects. For example, this principle can be used to control the harmful effects of a problem or to create stresses in an object that will oppose known undesirable working stresses later on.

Applying the principle of prior counteraction can help you find solutions to problems that have both good and bad effects.

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