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TRIZ Taking Out Principle

TRIZ has a long history, rooted in the work of Russian inventor Genrikh Altshuller. In the 1940s, Altshuller began to study how patents were created, and he noticed that many successful inventions followed similar patterns. He compiled his findings into a theory known as TRIZ, which stands for the "Theory of Inventive Problem Solving." TRIZ includes a number of principles that can be used to solve problems, one of which is the "taking out" principle. This principle is based on the idea that an invention can often be made simpler by removing unnecessary elements. For example, a flying machine could be made lighter and more efficient by removing the wheels. The taking out principle can be applied to any problem, and it can be a helpful tool for thinking creatively about solutions.

The TRIZ literature gives many examples of TRIZ taking out principles in use. For example

  • A bad smell can be removed by taking out the source of the smell.
  • A stain can be taken out by removing the substance that caused the stain.
  • A wrinkle can be taken out by removing the object that caused the wrinkle.
  • A hole can be taken out by removing the object that made the hole.

This principle is based on the idea that an invention can often be made simpler by removing unnecessary elements.

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